My Colorful Lexicon

I am not sure I can describe that which is continuously being created.

“The only one who can truly satisfy the human heart is the One who made it.”

—   (via s-a-b-r)

(via ahle-muslimah)

hijabishijab:

☪wisdom☪ ♥allah♥

“Make sure you don’t start seeing yourself through the eyes of those who don’t value you. Know your worth even if they don’t.”

—   Thema Davis (via acneao)

(Source: minuty, via kurtcobainlovechild)

“He who has nothing has Allah, And
He who has Allah has everything.”

—   (via 1religion1ummah)

(via ahle-muslimah)

fucksebastianstan:

basedpidgeot:

feather-in-my-cap-and-cheese:

urbendisaster:

what?

The wheels take impact and stress off your legs, and the position helps your spine, but you’re still doing running motions instead of biking motions, so your legs are getting a good workout, and you can go for longer

nerdy shit aside, iamgine how sick it must be to just let those feet fly into the air and do superman poses down a highway

"Nerdy shit aside u can act like Superman"

fucksebastianstan:

basedpidgeot:

feather-in-my-cap-and-cheese:

urbendisaster:

what?

The wheels take impact and stress off your legs, and the position helps your spine, but you’re still doing running motions instead of biking motions, so your legs are getting a good workout, and you can go for longer

nerdy shit aside, iamgine how sick it must be to just let those feet fly into the air and do superman poses down a highway

"Nerdy shit aside u can act like Superman"

(Source: cute-decoration, via myselfintact)

It is not selfish to pump and bottle feed your baby. It is also not selfish to formula feed your baby. Stop shaming mothers for making choices that will never have any effect on you.

(Source: author-and-a-mommy, via mynameisdua)

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

(via intherealmof)

iammyurl:

By Erica Kuschel.

If this doesn’t make you want to visit Peru, then you don’t deserve to see these pics. Shoo shoo scroll away.

(via intherealmof)

olddcassettes:

thisshipwreck:

therecipepantry:

Macaroni and Cheese Pizza

I would murder an entire family for this right now.

I die

(via intherealmof)

thirstingaintdead:

Thick everything. Thick thighs, thick eyebrows, thick lips. Thick maple syrup on my pancakes, thick everything.

(via sweetdisposition-xo)

stayspectacular:

uglysoulsbeautifulbodies:

DO NOT DISMISS A SOMETHING A CHILD IS PROUD OF. LOOK AT IT. POINT SOMETHING OUT AND TELL THEM YOU LOVE IT. IF A CHILD DRAWS YOU A RAINBOW, TELL THEM YOU LOVE HOW IT HAS RED. THEY WILL THINK “WOW. IT DOES HAVE RED. THEY LOVE HOW I PUT RED IN IT. I PUT RED IN IT. AND THEY NOTICED.” MAKE SURE YOUR CHILD KNOWS YOU ARE PROUD OF THEM.

This is so important

(Source: whitetrashchild, via thelittlestjay)

Anonymous said: Don't you think Islam is too "extreme" that you can't even shake hands with the opposite gender?

geesi:

musaafer:

No. 

But if you really wanna know what’s “extreme” (you don’t), I’ll have you know that it is pretty “extreme” to take a religious tradition with over 14 centuries of legal, philosophical, jurisprudential, exegetical, political, and societal thought, that has spread to just about every continent, that has come in contact with probably the majority of the world’s contemporary cultures, that has over a billion adherents in the world, that has at least five major schools of law, and that has an extraordinary capacity to be adaptable to space and time, and to reduce that tradition in its vast richness to one monolithic understanding of one arbitrary, useless issue. And while you’re at it, you can take your eurocentric understanding of what is “normal” behavior and shove it because if your primary concern with Islam is supposedly not being able to shake someone’s hand, your concern isn’t at all with the faith but with Otherizing and vilifying its adherents as ignorant followers of a religion that you, in your ignorance, have labeled as too extreme because it seemingly doesn’t conform to what you deem acceptable. 

Epic win.

majnouni:

THEY FLY!?!? I THOUGHT ALL THEY DID WAS SIT PRETTY.

majnouni:

THEY FLY!?!? I THOUGHT ALL THEY DID WAS SIT PRETTY.

(Source: mstrkrftz.com, via ahle-muslimah)

“Once you truly believe you’re worthy of love, you will never settle for anyone’s second best treatment.”

—   Charles J. Orlando (via aestheticintrovert)

(Source: zodiaccity, via aestheticintrovert)